The Five Best and Worst Things about this School Year

Every school year is going to have its ups and downs. While teaching is definitely a difficult profession, I feel blessed to have a job that gets me excited to go to work every day (well, almost every day). Last year I wrote an end-of-the-year post thanking my students for the opportunity to be their teacher. This time, I’ll be counting down the five best and worst things about this school year, or at least the things I am legally able to share.

So, here goes… five bad things, ranging from the catastrophic to the mildly annoying:

1. Losing my voice the entire first week of school. There’s really just no getting around this one. It sucks to be a person incapable of speech, much less a teacher trying to set the tone for the rest of the year. I usually lose my voice once a year for a day or so. This year I lost my voice for eight days, thanks to an unfortunate combination of laryngitis and food poisoning. On the bright side, my students were pretty understanding, and they wrote me letters so I could get to know them better. I was amazed how many wrote that they were excited to have me as their teacher, despite the fact that they had never heard me speak (or maybe because of it)! I do remember one funny moment when I was whispering to a student I had just met to show her to her assigned seat. In all her first-day-of-school eagerness, the poor girl whispered back.

2. Getting hit by a car on the way to school. I think this one also pretty much explains itself.

3. Stressing out about the faculty versus students free throw competition… and then going 1 for 6. Womp womp. Fortunately there was so much going on that week (if you were there, you remember), that nobody seemed to care. Still, the super-competitive side of me wants a rematch.

4. Every minute I had to spend in the halls. I remember the halls being stinky and crowded when I was in high school. At the school where I now teach, the halls are like the mall scene in Mean Girls: the teenage equivalent of a watering hole. Here rival students compete for dominance and try to attract the attention of a mate. In the halls, you see things you don’t want to see and hear things you really don’t want to hear. This year I had to monitor the third floor halls, which should be a piece of cake compared to the notoriously rough second floor. Here is a typical conversation between me and a student trying to skip class by wandering around the halls: Me- “Do you have a pass?” Student- silence. Me- “Where are you going?” Student- silence. Me- “Tell me your name.” Student- silence. Me- “You really need to go to class.” Student- silence. “Okay then, I’m just going to follow you until you go to class.” You can see how this would get frustrating after awhile.

5. Grading essays. Occasionally, a teacher will get the treat of grading a near-perfect essay. The other 99% of the time, trying to follow the convoluted logic, historical inaccuracies, and illegible handwriting of a fifteen-year-old is enough to make your brain hurt and your eyes water in pain. Then you have to do it 125 more times.

So that’s about it for the bad stuff; now on to the good. Here are the “greatest hits” of school year 2014-2015, or as it is known around these parts, our best year ever:

1. Getting to work with wonderful student leaders in the clubs that I sponsor. Being a faculty advisor can add a lot of time and stress to an already-busy workload—including before and after school meetings—with no additional financial benefit. Fortunately, I am blessed to work with student leaders whose motivation and organizational abilities I can only envy. I have had the opportunity to get to know my current and former students on a deeper level through their participation in clubs, and to witness their amazing talents and passions in action. One young man was riding his bike to a Key Club meeting early in the morning when he was hit by a car, who then drove off and left him bleeding in a parking lot. The next day, he apologized for not being there, bandages and all. Fear not; the future is bright!

2. Inspiring students to want to learn. It’s a cliché of course, but every teacher dreams of inspiring young minds to care about their particular field and to see its importance in their lives. My two favorite lessons of the year are both hands-on activities where the students take the lead. In the first lesson, I have students simulate Indian Ocean trade by buying and re-selling goods from various cities to see who can profit the most. It is hilarious to see them haggle with each other and come up with their own creative ways to attract business. The second lesson is the infamous “alliance game,” in which students strategize in six different “countries,” make deals, and finally go to war, engaging in clever diplomacy and military strategizing. This year each class had a great war (except for the one class where everyone got so tired of the lone neutral country that they decided to simultaneously invade them). Often the weakest students shine the brightest in these activities. Admittedly, trying to facilitate student engagement can have its false starts. There is nothing like seeing a hand go up in the middle of a heated debate from a kid who rarely contributes– to experience those fleeting moments of anticipation– only for the student to then ask to go to the bathroom.

3. Learning from my students. Every year I have that one student who teaches me more than I teach him or her. This year it was a young man from Afghanistan. He was bright, charismatic, and respectful, despite making it to class only about half of the time. He did not hesitate to share his opinions with the rest of the class, even though he was the only immigrant. At the beginning of the year, I wondered if I might have a problem with this student, as he seemed a bit too enthusiastic in his approval of patriarchy. I was explaining how, in classical China, women were supposed to stay in the home and take care of the kids. He began nodding his head enthusiastically, saying “yes, yes,” as the girls behind him scoffed and glared in his direction. But then something happened that was totally unexpected. In a round table discussion on the Scientific Revolution and secularism, he spoke out about his own religion’s need to modernize. This caught me and the other students completely off guard. In a world where so many struggle to understand the other side, he was able to see the pros and cons of both his highly traditional society and our modern one.

4. Working with and getting to know amazing colleagues. Let’s face it; we all get tired of dealing with teenagers seven hours a day, five days a week. Sometimes we just need some sympathetic adult conversation. I am not one of those teachers who encourages students to eat lunch in her room– sorry; that’s my time. Everyone needs to vent on occasion, but it is important as a teacher to surround yourself with positive people. I have been blessed to be surrounded by intelligent and caring colleagues who are always willing support me both professionally and personally, as I try to do for them. There is no better cure for a bad teaching experience than to share a good laugh with the only other people who would understand! Even more so than in the past, this year has witnessed the formation of new friendships and the deepening of older ones. I am profoundly grateful for both.

5. Being appreciated. Earlier today, I was packing up my room while trying to hunt down the dozen or so students still in danger of failing the semester. I was so ready to be done with it all and wondering whether anything I did this year actually made a difference. Then I looked in my mailbox and saw a letter. I opened it to find this message from a student I taught last year. It read:

Dear Mrs. G.,   

I am writing to thank you for always having passion. You were always so passionate about history and about teaching that it had to rub off on everyone. Watching you teach and talk with such enthusiasm made it so much more interesting to learn. You always seemed like you were happy to be there and happy to talk about it. Everyone saw it. Your passion enabled you to prepare us well for our AP test. You are a great teacher and you have influenced so many. Thank you for caring and making us care as well. I hope you never lose your passion and that it helps you as much as it does us. Thank you.

Now maybe she was instructed to write that letter by a parent, or perhaps another teacher. But in that moment, I really didn’t care. Her letter was a great reminder of how much we really mean to our students. We don’t always get the same immediate satisfaction as an architect surveying a completed house, or a lawyer who has won his case. Instead we get a test score, a number that is supposed to somehow represent what our students have either learned or not learned after nine months in our care. But regardless of tests passed or failed, the good we do never dies.

So, despite being in many ways a year of disasters, I will look back fondly on this school year. Being a teacher is a tremendous responsibility and privilege. Thanks to my amazing students and colleagues for making it all worthwhile. 

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One thought on “The Five Best and Worst Things about this School Year

  1. I had a similar moment like this today. I was looking back on all the mistakes and mishaps of the year, the times I had to hear things I didn’t want to hear, grade essays that tortured me, and had club plans almost collapse because of unforeseen events. And then I got a message that uplifted me.

    It always seems like many of these students like to procrastinate in saying thanks to us, like with everything else. Sometimes it seems like our efforts may be fruitless, when maybe we’re just planting a seed that will mature as they do in adulthood. Not all results show up at the end of a school year. But it’s nice to see them that soon.

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